Pig farm

“Crossing the border into Norfolk I saw my first pig farm and, until I spotted the almost invisible electric fence, I was impressed that they didn’t just wander off up the lane as there seemed to be nothing to keep them in. The dry bare soil extended almost to the lane with just a narrow, flat grass verge to mark the edge of their territory on the non-porcine side of the invisible fence. I’m sure that if they made a concerted effort they could have escaped but presumably regular food and shelter ensures their loyalty.

It was only as I drove along it occurred to me that they looked, to all intents and purposes, like flying pigs (presumably on their day off) as their half round shelters, arks I believe they are called, with open fronts looked like mini aircraft hangars. Strangely, about a mile past the pig hangars I passed a radar scanner at a nearby airfield so perhaps they were flying pigs after all.”

Abridged extract from In SatNav We Trust – A search for meaning through the historic counties of England exploring belief, rationalism, science and religion. A personal journey, autobiographical account, philosophical musings & characters along the way – a unique interpretation of life’s big questions using historic architecture, heritage, history & engineering, to explore & reflect on concepts of science & belief.

Find out more here: http://jack-barrow.com/travelogue-in-satnav-we-trust/

 

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